Three Totally Unbiased, Relevant Reasons Why Should You Buy An Alfa Giulietta Over The Golf

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Three Totally Unbiased, Relevant Reasons Why Should You Buy An Alfa Giulietta Over The Golf are discussed in this week’s column by Stjepan Sandor, covering one of the most important discussions in the automotive world these days.

1) Great engines
Multiair turbo engines are clearly one of the best in business, with great soundtrack, sufficient power and good MPG values. And let us not forget the great Multijet engines that diesel lovers can enjoy. In fact, I’d say that Multijet diesels are one of the best (if not the best) in the industry. Don’t forget, Alfa Romeo has practically invented common-rail and then sold it to Bosch. Also, the first car with common rail injection was the unforgettable Alfa Romeo 156 JTD, back in 1997, when Volkswagen was still using antiquated Bosch-pump systems.

I’d also like to use this opportunity to spit some more fire on the mediocre VW engines of yore, starting with the horribly wrong pump-nozzle system of the 00’s. I remember owning a Golf V with a 2-litre 140 bhp engine, and it was spectacularly horrible: the power delivery was as maniacal as a beaver with rabies, and it drank more oil than Charlie Sheen does vodka for breakfast.

On the other hand, my friend’s 166 sedan was purring like a kitten.

And while the VW’s diesels aren’t that bad, their TSI engines are prone to be unreliable (just google TSI engine failure) or chech out this: http://www.caradvice.com.au/99056/volkswagen-1-4tsi-twincharger-to-be-phased-out-report/

2) Value for money
Let’s make a quick comparison between the Golf and Giulietta. We’ll analyse both cars in popular trims, high-powered diesels and factory new, without dealer discounts. And here are the prices (for the German market):

Alfa Romeo Giulietta 2.0 JTDm Turismo (170 bhp), Nero Etna Metallic, Pelle Nero – 29.740 €
Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI Highline (150 bhp) Deep Black Perleffekt, Leder Vienna – 32.865 €

It is also important to note that the Giulietta comes with more standard equipment (LED DRL’s, Bluetooth, Knee airbag…) although the Golf has Xenons and 17″ rims as standard, which are optional on the Italian. Both come with electronic differential locks for front wheels and start stop systems.

The truth is, Golf will hold its value much better than the Giulietta, but Alfa has a 20 bhp stronger engine, goes faster from 0-60 and has more torque.

From a petrolhead’s point of view, this is a no brainer.

Also, don’t forget that everything from above also applies to the Audi A3, which has the same chassis, engines and gearboxes like the Golf but its more even expensive for its inferior steering, rock-hard ride, plusher interior and a better badge.

3) Image and design
There really is no discussion here: With an evocative name, glamorous history and Italian design, Alfa Romeo Giulietta instantly reminds you of its racing roots, while the Volkswagen does really stand for one thing – Hitler.

And even though the VW isn’t exactly ugly, I seriously doubt that it will win any beauty contest soon. The basic shape hasn’t changed since the Golf V (like ten years ago!) and it is as emotional as a kitchen appliance. On the other hand, the Giulietta is gorgeous.

It may not be as stunning as the Alfas of past, but with the right set of wheels and the right colour, you cannot deny that is the most special looking car in class.

Try Rosso Alfa with tan leather seats and telephone dial wheels and you’ll feel like you’re stuck in a Fellini movie.

Still, we may have compared the top of the end models, but even in the low end compartment, you cannot go wrong with the Alfa. Just take a look to the suspension: All Golfs under 122 bhp get a primitive, torsion beam axle (which screams 1998.) while all Giuliettas have a multilink axle.

That may not be important to some, but why should you settle for less?